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MARK V INTRODUCTION
Introduction
Building the System
Add Major Accessories
Add Specialty Accessories and Machines
Safety
Safety Factors Built into the System
Important Safety Equipment
General Safety Rules for Power Tools
Speeds

MARK V Introduction
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Pg. 1-4, Pg 5-8, Pg 9-12

Safety Factors Built into the System

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Figure 1-20. Most shop accidents happen on unguarded power tools. Guards like the upper saw guard keep your hands out of the danger zone and help prevent kickback. Warning: Be sure to keep all guards mounted during operations.

Warning: For your safety, always read, understand and follow the procedures in the Owners Manual and use the guards and safety equipment that came with your machines.

The Shopsmith Woodworking System has many built-in safety features, but the effectiveness of these features depends on you.

Guards--Most shop accidents happen on unguarded power machines. Therefore, it is important to keep guards in working order and to always keep them mounted on the machine during operations. Guards, like the upper saw guard shown in Figure 1-20, are designed to prevent kickback and to help keep your hands out of the danger zone.

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Figure 1-21. The miter gauge with safety grip is more than a safety device. It clamps the workpiece for positive control, making it easier to achieve accuracy. It's great for sawing, but equally useful for other operations.

Safety Accessories and Devices--Accessories and devices such as the miter gauge with safety grip, fixtures and extensions help to keep your hands away from the blade, cutter or disc. The miter gauge with safety grip holds the stock securely and safely during the operation (Figure 1-21). Rip fence and miter gauge extensions, and fixtures that you can make help to support and guide the stock (Figure 1-22).

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Figure 1-22. Rip fence and miter gauge extensions, and frxtures will help to guide and support the stock safely. The rip fence extension shown is supporting long stock during a ripping cut.

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Figure 1-23. The Shopsmith Safety Kit includes (A) a push stick, (B) a push block, (C) a fence straddler, and (D) a feather board.

Shopsmith Safety Kit--The safety kit (Figure 1-23) contains a push stick, push block, feather board and fence straddler.These devices either help guide, hold and control the stock safely during operations on the Mark V or Major Accessories.

The push stick (Figure 1-24) is used to guide small to medium sized stock. Place the foot on top of the stock and hook the heel over the back edge.

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Figure 1-24. A push stick is used to maneuver small to medium-sized stock. Hold the workpiece down with the foot of the push stick and hook the heel over the back edge.

The push block (Figure 1-25) is used to hold down and guide the stock. As you press down, forward, and to the side, the rubber pad grips the stock. The handle is tilted to help keep your hands out of the danger zone.

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Figure 1-25. Use the push block to hold down and guide the stock. As you press down, the pad grips the stock. The handle is tilted to help keep your hands out of the danger zone.

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Figure 1-26. Use the feather board to help press the stock against the rip fence (as shown) or the table. Place the mounting bar in the table slot and tighten the locking knobs. Remember that the fingers must be angled in the same direction that you feed the stock.

The feather board (Figure 1-26) is used to press stock against the rip fence or the table. Mount the feather board in a table slot, in the slot of a fence extension, or clamp it to the table. The fingers must be angled in the same direction that you feed the stock-use the arrow on top of the feather board as a guide. Position the fingers so they press against the stock just before it gets to the blade or cutter, then tighten the locking knobs. To reverse the direction of the fingers, remove the mounting bar, turn the feather board over, then replace the bar.

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Figure 1-27. Use the fence straddler to guide small, narrow stock. The body rides on the rip fence, while the heel hooks over the back edge of the stock. To change the height of the heel, loosen the locking knob.

The fence straddler (Figure 1-27) is used to hold down and guide small narrow stock past a blade or cutter. The body rides on the rip fence, while the heel hooks over the back edge of the stock. To change the height of the heel, loosen the locking knob. To reverse the heel, rotate the side 180° Be sure the locking knob is secure before using the straddler.

 

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Figure 1-28. Mark V table inserts are designed to accommodate various cutting tools. Here, from left to right, are Model 500 inserts for a saw blade, dado head, and molder head. A shaper and drum sander insert is also available.

Mark V Table Inserts--TheMark V worktable has an openingthat is shaped to receive various table inserts, each of which is designed to accommodate a particular blade or cutter (Figure 1-28). The purpose of the insert is to support the stock and to minimize the opening around the cutting tool. If you're working with very thin stock that could be drawn down into the opening, make special inserts like the one shown in Figure 1-29. As you can see, there is no room for thin material to be pulled beneath the table.

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Figure 1-29. Special inserts that you can make keep thin material from being pulled down beneath the table.

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Figure 1-30. The Mark V main and auxiliaiy spindles have a reverse taper. The locking setscrew of all spindle-mounted accessories must seat Securely against the flat.

Mark V Spindles--The main Mark V spindle and the upper auxiliary spindle which projects at the rear of the power plant are designed with a "reverse taper" to keep accessories secured. All the accessories and arbors that mount on the spindles must be positioned so the locking screw seats firmly against the flat (Figure 1-30). This is a safety feature that is provided as a precaution against tools com-ing off the spindle should the locking screw become loose.

To properly mount an accessory, push it all the way on the spindle. Then use a 5/32" Allen wrench to tighten the setscrew against the flat of the spindle. To make sure the accessory is securely mounted, rock the accessory back and forth slightly as you tighten the setscrew and then again after it is tight, while keeping the spindle from turning, If the accessory seems to loosen, tighten the setscrew again until you've removed any 'play.' Warning: During any prolonged operation, always check the locking screw occasionally to be sure that normal tool vibration hasn't caused the screw to loosen.

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